Tag Archives: Hindustan

Creativity Transcends Borders

Honestly, the single best facet of any form of creativity for me is the way it transcends cultures, language, races – basically anything we fall back on to discriminate.

Creative pieces can bring you to your knees and exalt you to the top of the Himalayas in one instant – that is its unique power.

It always makes me celebrate how much more similar we are than disparate and for me, that is always a good thing.

So, in this spirit I thought I’d share an example of this with you – this is for anyone who needs to be reminded that no matter what, humanity is still winning 🙂

I hope it brings a smile to your face like it did mine.

Have a wonderful week ahead everyone!

India - Busy Street

Are you from Slumdog Millionaire?

Honestly?

Seriously?

Um, no.

If I have to hear one more “innocent” remark on whether Slumdog Millionaire brings back bitter sweet memories, well let’s just say I cannot be held responsible for any ensuing actions.

It still baffles me why certain “developing nations” are only recalled for certain mundane, overly stereotyped versions of malnutrition, flies (every country has flies people, every country), painfully demonised diseases and generally poor human conditions when we have other stuff to offer, really we do.

When I say Africa, people conjure up skinny children. When I say India, people conjure up Slumdog Millionaire, when I say Middle East, people conjure up terrorism.

On the other side of the coin when I say Australia, people conjure up Blond bombshells on Bondi Beach. I say America, people conjure up glamorous Hollywood. I say England; people conjure up grand historical monuments.

My point? Every country has the good and the bad, it’s easy to forget that Africa has an amazing intricate royal system, India has wonderful examples of people from different parts of the world not just living, but rejoicing in one another (Taj Mahal people, Taj Mahal) and Middle East is breathtakingly beautiful in all its natural wonder.

Oh, and guess what? Poverty sux and it’s not just restricted to the “third world region” but I’m not here to air other people’s dirty laundry in public. So the next time you come to India and choose to take a photo of the beggar outside the Taj Mahal and forget about the amazing monument my country has to offer, just remember others could do the same and take a photo of the homeless dude in front of the Harbour Bridge too. Show the respect you expect please and if you’re having trouble coming up with what India has to offer, check this link out for some inspiration.

Rant officially over.

Thank you.

Diwlai 2015

Happy Diwali Everyone!

May this Festival of Lights shower much happiness, joy and splendour on all of you!

Have a lot of good food, sweets and precious moments with your loved ones as we celebrate the glorious Festival of Lights around the World!

Yay!!!!

Image Taken From: Kelley Bozarth. Like her work? Check out kelleydealphotography.com 

Quit Complaining, Will You?

Most of those who know me will attest to my incessant love for my country of origin.

I consider myself lucky to have never been confused about my identity and heritage because it was the only consistent part of my being throughout my travels across international man-made borders (but that’s another Blog Post).

What does irk me though, is our (and I am prepared to get some, scratch that, quite a bit of flak about this) continuous requirement to constantly whinge about why everything that is untoward in India is the government’s fault.

I’m not here to discuss my political viewpoints or actively promote any particular party but what I would like to just throw into the spanner is the novel idea of a country being made up of, wait for it, its people.

What makes up India or Australia or whatever country you’re currently in is NOT a representative party but people like YOU.

So, the next time you’re about to go on a rampage about why “X” is happening in your country and why it’s “YOUR GOVERNMENT’S” fault, take a step back and think about what you’re doing to exasperate or reduce the effects, the implications or the cause/s of the issue/s.

As an Indian with a distinctly Aussie flavour (and a sprinkling of British), I often wonder about what I’m doing to effectively combat the issues my countries are facing at the moment, do you?

Let me know below! 🙂

14 reasons people should Google Indian before asking us these questions!

Let me just point out at the outset that some of these hilarious remarks are a little over the top for added effect … but not by much.

If I had a penny for every single time strangers slow down their sentences in case I don’t understand English, well let’s just say, I could quit my day job and write full time!

Apparently, the more tanned you are is in direct opposition to your ability to string coherent English sentences together 😀 😀 😀

My granduncle was constantly asked whether we still lived in trees back home to which he would aptly reply, “of course we do, we just get up there with escalators. Climbing trees is so yesterday”. Why anyone would actually believe that was a suitable question to ask a lawyer living in Europe for ten years is beyond me, but hey … each to their own I guess.

Me too!

I’m not one to usually explode my lungs shouting out about my heritage from the rooftops because I believe pride in ones origin is one that normally includes quiet contemplation. Otherwise you just sound like a borderline bigoted racist, but that’s just my opinion!

However, every so often you come across something like this and it just makes me feel shivery and tingly all over, but most of all it makes me feel grateful. I don’t believe you have to be Indian to “feel” this video because though the nuances may be extremely Indian, I think the emotions are universal for anyone who thinks about home.

Gazing through the Perspective Window …

I broke my seven day fast today and once my bouncing off the walls in excitement celebratory activities at the thought of being able to consume garlic and onion once again had subsided, I started to reflect once more on why fasting is so important to me on my journey of gratefulness.

People will often question me on the point of fasting and though I used to struggle on the various “religious” reasons for the abstaining of certain foods, I have come to realise that fasting is honestly a very personal struggle. I commenced this fast quite a few years ago at first to be a sympathetic communal faster with my mum, basically so she didn’t feel like she was being punished (as I saw it in my mind at the time) on her own, my own mother beginning her Navratri fasting endeavours when her mum couldn’t keep them one year as she was ill at the opportune event.

I recall inhumane pangs of scrumptious desire for seductively mouth-watering delights during my seven to eight day struggle as being a lot more severe when I started in comparison to my (almost) indifferent attitude now. Don’t get me wrong, I still rush to the fridge on Ashtami to break my fast the way a raging bull gallops towards a vibrant red cloth, my fingers clambering to get a carrot in my mouth before Bugs Bunny could possibly finish his famous rendition of “what’s up Doc?”, but I don’t feel quite as desperate any longer.

The reason for this, I believe, is my newfound enthusiasm for the concept of fasting on an individual level. This has nothing to do with any misguided Eureka cloaked Holy Grail moments or sudden knee jerking spiritual awakenings, but more with my “let’s stop and have a look around” attitude that I somehow just (fortunately) fell into.

It’s so easy for me to take what I have for granted – my latest designer-wear clothes, my 58 inch Plasma TV Set I am joined at the hip to, my gluttonous never ending need to absolutely have those pair of pumps, and all the other unquenchable satanic requirements recklessly pounding against the walls of my cranium. As simplistic as it may sound, nothing makes me comprehend the way it feels to be so close to something and not being able to have it than when I am fasting. When I can smell all the wondrously wafting, teasing aromas that weave their meticulous yet sinister paths up my nasal passages, the way tantalising shades burst their delectable splendour on my partners plates, where heavenly fragrances, tastes and textures are so close I could touch and then devour them instantly … and still so cruelly not being able to consume them.

My mother used to often recite the worn out slogan of “do you know how lucky you are to be able to eat? Do you understand that there are so many starving children out there who dream to get what you have on your plate at this very moment?” every single time I complained about what was put in front of me. Until I started fasting, I just thought it was just another one of those pesky “learn as you live, words of wisdom” moments my parents were so bent on imparting with me until I realised how true it was.

I see so many around me that are so devastatingly less fortunate and fasting twice a year reminds me of those individuals perpetually. For a few hours, I can at least sympathise (clearly not understand) but empathise with them and the turmoil they must be going through about being so close to living the way everyone’s birth right should allow for and being so cruelly locked out.

So this morning, as I broke my fast and felt my mind shamelessly flirting with the devilry vegetables encompass I once again remembered how fortunate I am to be able to put my finger on something and get it. It makes me all that more grateful for the gifts I have and to remember not to so easily dismiss those around me who eye me with what people often mistake for envious disdain but to actually see beyond our glazed looking glass of perspectives.

Wishing everyone a Happy Ashtami come Ram Naumi and may each and every one of us be blessed with all the wonders the Universe has to offer, sprinkled with just the right amount of genuine compassion and understanding 🙂