Tag Archives: Politicians

Quit Complaining, Will You?

Most of those who know me will attest to my incessant love for my country of origin.

I consider myself lucky to have never been confused about my identity and heritage because it was the only consistent part of my being throughout my travels across international man-made borders (but that’s another Blog Post).

What does irk me though, is our (and I am prepared to get some, scratch that, quite a bit of flak about this) continuous requirement to constantly whinge about why everything that is untoward in India is the government’s fault.

I’m not here to discuss my political viewpoints or actively promote any particular party but what I would like to just throw into the spanner is the novel idea of a country being made up of, wait for it, its people.

What makes up India or Australia or whatever country you’re currently in is NOT a representative party but people like YOU.

So, the next time you’re about to go on a rampage about why “X” is happening in your country and why it’s “YOUR GOVERNMENT’S” fault, take a step back and think about what you’re doing to exasperate or reduce the effects, the implications or the cause/s of the issue/s.

As an Indian with a distinctly Aussie flavour (and a sprinkling of British), I often wonder about what I’m doing to effectively combat the issues my countries are facing at the moment, do you?

Let me know below! 🙂

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Why you matter

If it’s been done before then you can do it too. If not, you can be the first. Nothing’s impossible!

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve wanted to do something or I’ve started a discussion about doing something and I’m met with that blank, “what the hell is wrong with you?” stare.

Inevitably, this is followed by the “what can one person do?” question, which is what gets me thinking. What can one person do?

Have you ever witnessed a cup filled to the absolute brim and then you pour just one, single drop of water and it overflows? That is what one person can do. You can be the catalyst for change, change in your broader community, change in one person’s mind-set but change nevertheless. It’s up to you to make that change positive or negative.

My mum directed my attention to this wonderful initiative called GetUp over the weekend and let me just say I’m hooked! Not to mention slightly envious of the two people who thought this wonderful concept up, damn, why didn’t I? 😀

It’s really brilliant and if anything, it warms the heart to know that there are others (A LOT more than one single drop in the ocean) that feel a similar way that you do – they care.

We ARE better than this, Australia …

I had a GREAT awakening this morning, I always feel buoyed by examples of people power. Gives me that warm, fuzzy rumbling feeling in my insides that accompanies true hope for the future.

Australians are proud of their renowned charitable nature which is why I am constantly left scratching my head in my perplexed inability to comprehend where that “true blue” Aussie spirit has gone when it comes to refugees and most importantly, children in detention centres.

Children don’t care about boundaries, or race, or religion, or political gain. Children believe in true freedom, imagination, wishes becoming reality – everything all of us adults should sincerely trust in if we ever want to experience that elusive emancipation we are constantly sprinting after.

Which is why I cast my vote in at http://wbttaus.org/.

As an Aussie, you can do it too, as a citizen of the World you can do it to, as a human being – you can do it too.

We live in a Democracy but … you’re not allowed to say that.

“But” – such a seemingly simple, nonabrasive word, hardly ever recognised for its severe hypocrisy enamoured intentions and the scantily clad evilness it embodies. Often, I hate the word “but” because it provides us with the ability to shift the blame onto some invisible imaginary wickedness outside of ourselves no one else can quite seem to see.

“I don’t hate you but …”, “I’m really quite an open minded person but …”, “That country doesn’t deserve being bombed the way it has but…” The list is never ending, in a painful sort of way. A general rule of thumb that I try to live with every time I hear the word “but” is to disregard every single syllable that unfortunately preceded it, which believe me, is extremely difficult because it is often times someone’s best material. Everything tends to go downhill once that foreboding word “but” is included.

As some of you may know, Australia is going through a very democratic BUT questionable rule at the moment that basically puts a muzzle on everyone else who isn’t a politician. It’s a shame I know (not to mention enormously embarrassing) for a country that prides itself on being a crusader for democracy BUT it is a question of national security after all. Well naturally, that should be explanation enough if not for that one measly detail – all those advocates for truth? You know the ones I’m speaking of – the Julian Assange’s and Eric Snowden’s of the World.

If you were truly off your rockers and decided to believe what’s coming out of our current politicians mouths, regardless of the party they belong to (isn’t it creepy when opposing political members get together?) this innovative rule that basically involves everything we say being censored by the government is actually to keep us safe. Come on, when the words “national security” are mentioned, obviously that should be enough for us to take their word for it. Isn’t that what it’s all about, them verses us?

While watching Q & A on Monday night (a program that encourages free thinking) on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation free to air television channel, a politician actually had the gall, (can you believe it), the ludicrous audacity to promote her vicious, down right undemocratic stance against free speech by telling a journalist (of all people) that an anti-freedom of speech law was required because, wait for it, not all journalists are socially responsible. Aha, that makes sense because I can count on one hand the amount of “socially responsible honest” politicians out there. Hang on – can I call a friend for this question please?

I don’t know about you, but I don’t exactly feel very secure with the idea of global politicians being the gatekeepers of truth, not with the human rights records a lot of countries have, the (often leaked) dismal, inhumane and downright “slave inspired” conditions of our detention centres, and well, some of the nincompoops we have (obviously in a drunken stupor) elected to represent us.

I thought evolution meant we were supposed to get better, not the other way round. Am I on a different page, or better yet, book? Aren’t we supposed to be getting more open minded and better at sharing knowledge rather than keeping the dirty (and often not so little) secrets of corrupt politicians under wraps? Hang on, aren’t you, Australian Government supposed to be representing me? I don’t recall ticking the “please silence me unless I agree with you” check box on the ballot paper the last time I voted.

This is not about who gets whose vote, there are more important issues on hand at the moment. This is not about being on anyone’s side, it’s about standing up for what’s right. The journalist on Q&A said it right, the government can try and lock truth seekers up as much as they want BUT for every Assange or Snowden they attempt to get rid of, a hundred more who are willing to stand up for what’s right no matter what the consequences will mushroom towards the surface. Muzzle that.